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Showing posts from February, 2018

At Home Care For Tension Headaches: Part 2 - At Home Treatment

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In our last blog, we looked at some of the main causes and symptoms of tension headaches. In this blog, we will be looking into at home care you can provide yourself to relieve the symptoms of your tension headaches. As always, please consult with your primary care provider prior to any type of treatment.

Treatment of Tension Headache

Massage therapy is highly recommended in the event of a tension headache. Even if you are able to decrease the headache with at home treatment, there may be underlying fascial restrictions that could lead to a repeat episode. Massage therapy can help to decrease a recurrence. If this is an avenue you would like to pursue, please contact a licensed massage therapist near you.

First, if you are experiencing a tension headache, start diaphragmatic breathing to assist with getting proper oxygen flow to the area.

Pre-treat the area with heat. You can use a flax seed pillowheating pad, or soak in a warm bath. Heat can be applied for 5-15 minutes. Please be cau…

Trigger Point: Temporalis

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Please be sure to refer to What Are Trigger Points and How To Release Trigger Points when working on trigger points at home. As always, please consult with your primary care physician prior to any type of treatment.

Temporalis: Muscular Origins, Insertions, Actions, and Nerve Innervations

The temporalis muscle originates along the temporal fossa and the fascia of the skull; it inserts into the coronoid process of the mandible. When working, the temporalis elevates the mandible at the temporomandibular joint, and it retracts the mandible. The main nerve associated with this muscle is the trigeminal nerve.

Temporalis Trigger Points: Location and Possible Symptoms

When a trigger point is active in the temporalis muscle, you may experience a headache in the side and front of the head. These trigger points can also can pain and/or hypersensitivity in the upper teeth.

Trigger points found in the sternocleidomastoid and  masseter muscles have been known to activate trigger points within the…

Trigger Point: Splenius Muscles

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Please be sure to refer to What Are Trigger Points and How To Release Trigger Points when working on trigger points at home. As always, please consult with your primary care physician prior to any type of treatment.

Splenius: Muscular Origins, Insertions, Actions, and Nerve Innervations

The splenius muscles are located along the back of the neck down into the upper back. They can easily be palpated between the upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles. There are two main muscle bellies within the splenius group: splenius capitis and splenius cervicis. The splenius capitis muscle originates at the ligamentum nuchae and the spinous processes of vertebrae C-7 thru T-3 and inserts into the mastoid process and lateral nuchal line. Splenius cervicis originates from the spinous processes of vertebrae T-3 thru T-6 and inserts into the transverse processes of the upper cervical vertebrae.

When contracted together, these muscles work to extend the head and neck. When contracted separate…

Trigger Point: Occipitofrontalis

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Please be sure to refer to What Are Trigger Points and How To Release Trigger Points when working on trigger points at home. As always, please consult with your primary care physician prior to any type of treatment.

Occipitofrontalis: Muscular Origins, Insertions, Actions, and Nerve Innervations

The occipitofrontalis muscle consists of two main muscle bellies, one in the front of the head, the other in the back of the head, that both originate from the galea aponeurotica. The galea aponeurotica is a broad sheet of connective tissue that stretches across the top of the skull. The frontalis muscle belly attaches to the skin over the eyebrows and is responsible for raising the eyebrows and wrinkling the forehead. The occipitalis

Occipitofrontalis Trigger Points: Location and Possible Symptoms

When a trigger point in the occipitalis muscle belly becomes active, you may feel pain along the side and back of your head. It has also been known to cause a traveling pain that goes through the …

Trigger Points: Suboccipital Muscles

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Please be sure to refer to What Are Trigger Points and How To Release Trigger Points when working on trigger points at home. As always, please consult with your primary care physician prior to any type of treatment.

Suboccipitals: Muscular Origins, Insertions, Actions, and Nerve Innervations
Our suboccipital muscles are composed of eight small muscles that run between the nuchal line of the occiput, our first cervical vertebrae, and our second cervical vertebrae. They assist us in being able to rotate our head, tilt the head backwards into extension, and tilt the head from side to side without moving the neck.

The nerve associated with these muscles is the suboccipital nerve.

Suboccipital Muscle Trigger Points: Location and Possible Symptoms


Feeling for these muscles may be difficult since they are under several other muscles and are right on the spine. When palpating these muscles, be sure to significantly warm up the area ahead of time and ease into the area so as to not cause pain…

Trigger Point: Sternocleidomastoid

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Please be sure to refer to What Are Trigger Points and How To Release Trigger Points when working on trigger points at home. As always, please consult with your primary care physician prior to any type of treatment.

Sternocleidomastoid: Muscular Origins, Insertions, Actions, and Nerve Innervations

The Sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle originates at the top of the manubrium for the sternal head and at the medial third of the clavicle for the clavicular head. Both muscle bellies insert at the mastoid process of the temporal bone as well as the lateral superior nuchal line of the occiput.

When only one side of the SCM muscle is activated, the actions are to laterally flex the head to the same side, rotate the head to the opposite side. When you activate both of your sternocleidomastoid muscles, you are able to perform flexion of the neck. These muscles can also assist in respiratory inhalation.

The nerve associated with this muscle is the spinal accessory nerve.

Sternocleidomastoid Trigg…

Trigger Point: Upper Trapezius

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Please be sure to refer to What Are Trigger Points and How To Release Trigger Points when working on trigger points at home. As always, please consult with your primary care physician prior to any type of treatment.

Upper Trapezius: Muscular Origins, Insertions, Actions, and Nerve Innervations
Our upper trapezius muscle is located in our upper back to neck. The muscle originates from the external occipital protuberance, the medial portion of the superior nuchal line of the occiput, and the ligamentum nuchae. The muscle fibers insert into the lateral third of the clavicle, acromion process, and the spine of the scapula.

When contracted, the upper fibers of the trapezius muscle extend the head and neck. The nerves that are associated with this muscle are the spinal accessory and the cervical plexus.

Upper Trapezius Trigger Points: Location and Possible Symptoms


The upper trapezius has two main trigger points. The first one is located in the more superficial muscle fibers as illustrated a…